Tag Archives: Saint-Exupéry

Lit Links: Remembering ‘El Gabo’, 2014 Pulitzer Prize Winners, When Memoirs Go Bad

Celebrating the Conjurer of Literary Magic
The New York Times ran a wonderful obit of Gabriel García Márquez, who passed away on Thursday, reminding us all how Márquez changed the literary landscape. Time to re-read One Hundred Years of Solitude.

The Cost of Spilling Family Secrets Norwegian writer Karl Ove Knausgaard’s six-part, brutally honest autobiographical novel, My Struggle, has turned him into an international literary sensation – and made him an outcast to his friends and family. The New Republic looks at the personal cost of writing the truth.

Catching up on the 2014 Pultizer Prize Winners
Donna Tartt’s The Goldfinch won the 2014 Pulitzer for fiction (well deserved in our opinion).  Longreads compiled pieces from the winners of the other categories – perfect for your weekend reading.

Saint-Exupéry, Saintly Hands, Sainted Innocence
Guernica looks at what inspired the man behindThe Little Prince.

The Disillusionist
Imagine a family like the Downton Abbey clan gone bad. ” Edward St. Aubyn is from a failed aristocratic family, headed by a sexually abusive and tyrannical father. From a bleak childhood, he grew up to be “a raging heroin addict and also a brilliant, corrosive master of Wildean one-liners.” The Atlantic looks at his new novel, Lost for Words, which chronicles his strange and curious life.

Radka Denemarková on translating Herta Müller
Czech novelist, playwright and translator Radka Denemarková on the joys and trials of translating the work of Nobel Prize winner  Herta Müller.

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